As you may know the phosphors in the old cathode-ray TV screens got the picture or text ‘burned in’ if it didn’t change, so Starfield and other apps were developed to prevent this saturation. I don’t know if LED screens have this problem, but now we have a gazillion (10GAZ) screen saver apps.

Because of the modifications I’ve made in my travel trailer, people have more contact with the window screens and because the windows tilt out, the screens are on the inside. After two repairs in one month, I had an idea. My windows are divided in half horizontally, The upper half is fixed glass, no screen. The bottom half is a screened louver at the same level as shoulders and in range of heads and elbows. After I had to patch a screen twice, the engineer in me came up with a simple solution: “Install Hard-Wire Screen Savers.”

At the ACE hardware store I bought one 8-foot & one 10-foot long wire closet shelves and a bag of end caps. The shelves were white, 45 cm (12”) wide with a 2 cm (1”) lip on one edge. Nothing fancy, no brackets, no braces, no screws, no plastic clips, just tiny caps for the cut ends. I cut three at 152 cm (4-11 5/8″) pieces for the main windows, and one at 56cm (22”) length for the bathroom window. This extra length sets behind the surface flange of the window frame and keeps the screen in place. Then I cut the wires that interfered with the crank/knob.
What a difference! Some big male (who me?) has bumped into the window twice with no repair needed.

It can happen, with His help.
L.Mo



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